Category Archives: ECOreport Radio

Conversation With Claire Trevena, MLA for North Island

The ECOreport publishes the first part of a Conversation With Claire Trevena, MLA for North Island, about the upcoming election

By Roy L Hales

With British Columbia’s provincial election approaching, I decided to interview the candidates in my riding. Dallas Smith, who is attempting to capture this seat for the BC Liberals, has yet to respond to my emails. Green candidate Sue Moen and I will be talking soon. My conversation with Claire Trevena, MLA for Island North, took place on a bench overlooking the wharves at Heriot Bay, on Quadra Island.
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The Limitations Of Bioremediation

The ECOreport interviews Rex Weyler about ecological solutions for our planet’s environmental problems &; the limitations of bioremediation

By Roy L Hales

In its’ simplest form, bio-restoration is something that every farmer every just does naturally.  In this interview, Canadian  ecologist/journalist Rex Weyler talks about natural solutions to most of the world’s environmental problems and the limitations of bioremediation.

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The Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwépemc Nation Says No To Ajax Mines

The ECOreport looks at the reasons the Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwépemc Nation Says No To Ajax Mines

By Roy L Hales

The mining sector may be struggling, but it is still big business in British Columbia. According to the Northern Miner,mining is “one of the hottest sectors of the Canadian stock market.” At the beginning of this year, there were 702 British Columbia based mineral exploration and mining companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange and TSXV exchanges. Some of the A BC Liberal party’s biggest campaign contributors are mining companies. Though KGHM Ajax Mines is not one of them, having forked out a mere $55,450,1 a new mining start would definitely bolster Premier Christy Clark’s image within the industry. Only there is more at stake than money when it comes to a proposed 2,500-hectare open-pit copper and gold mine on the outskirts of the city of Kamloops. This is an area that local first nations consider sacred and after careful deliberation, the Stk’emlúpsemc te Secwépemc Nation says no to Ajax Mines.

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  1. KGHM AJAX MINING INC’s donations to the BC Liberal Party: 2013/03/01 – $2,000.00;  2013/12/31 – $10,000.00; 2014/03/28 – $1,000.00; 2014/03/28 – $2,000.00; 2014/04/14 – $400.00; 2014/07/04 – $250.00; 2014/07/04 – $250.00; 2014/10/10 – $10,000.00 ; 2015/03/06  – $2,000.00 ; 2015/04/10 – $5,000.00 ; 2015/06/19 – $2,000.00; 2015/11/20 – $20,000.00 ; KGHM INTERNATIONAL’s donations to the BC Liberal Party:  2015/02/13 – $550.00

Cortes Islanders Support Standing Rock

The ECOreport looks at a North Dakota tribes’ resistance to a proposed pipeline crossing their only source of water and the extend to which Cortes Islanders support Standing Rock

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pm1The Standing Rock Sioux’s struggle to halt the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, a half mile north of their reservation, has gained international recognition. The Guardian’s coverage began on April 2, with a story of 200 Native Americans who “took to horseback” in a mounted protest. In August, Reuters reported on the tribe’s attempt to obtain an injunction against construction. As of this morning, Democracy Now has posted 154 stories. That’s just the media. Many North American communities have held demonstrations. Two events, in a relatively remote part of British Columbia, illustrate the extent to which Cortes Islanders Support Standing Rock.

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Inside One Of British Columbia’s Disappearing Old Growth Rainforests

The ECOreport reviews the documentary film Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux, which offers viewers a rare glimpse inside one of British Columbia’s disappearing old growth rainforests.

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pmMost of us have seen historical photographs of the great forests that once stood in British Columbia. Though his family has worked in the forestry sector for a century, Damien Gillis’ first view of a forest like this came during a six-day-trek into the Incomappleux Valley. The award documentary film maker (Fractured Land, Oil in Eden) says, “it was like nothing I’ve seen before, just the way the ecosystem is really a cycle of life, death and rebirth right before your eyes.” Some of the trees he saw had been saplings around the time of the Roman Empire. The resulting documentary, Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux offers viewers a rare glimpse inside one of BC’s disappearing old growth rainforests.

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Living With A Trump Presidency

The ECOreport interviews Dr Allan Hoffman, a former senior analyst with the D.O.E., about living with a Trump Presidency

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pmThe American people have spoken. Donald Trump is not Dr Allan Hoffman’s choice for President. While it is still possible that Trump will be more reasonable than his pre-election rhetoric suggests, this is unlikely. Hoffman described Trump as a demagogue who appears to be a climate denier, whose statements about energy were “uninformed, ignorant and terrible.” Never-the-less, he has been elected and, for the next four years, “the American public is going to have to live with that.” Hoffman spoke about the realities of living with a Trump presidency.

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Bring Salmon Farms On Land

The ECOreport looks at British Columbian companies and the push to bring salmon farms on land

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pmCanada’s $2 billion Aquaculture industry is embroiled in controversy. While there may be some debate as to whether wild salmon spread more infections to British Columbia’s penned stock or vice versa,1 there have been incidents like the Queen Charlotte Strait’s 2015 sea lice epidemic.2 On May 20, 2016, Dr Kristi Miller, from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, announced that there is “a potential Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation (HSMI) in farmed Atlantic salmon samples” collected from a aquaculture facility off the coast of Vancouver Island. In Norway, where HSMI is more common, this disease is “associated with generally low mortality on farms, generally between 0 to 20%.”3 The stress (and thus mortality rate) is undoubtedly greater on wild salmon, which need to capture prey, escape predators and swim upstream to spawn. So, acting on behalf of marine biologist Alexandra Morton, ECOjustice is suing Canada’s Ministry of Fisheries for putting wild salmon at risk. Some argue the best answer is to bring salmon farms on land.

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  1. Marine Harvest Canada’s (MHC)studies show that the prevalence of sea lice in wild salmon stocks is unaffected by the presence, or absence, of fish farms. Katherine Dolmage, MHC’s Certification Officer, claims that wild salmon definitely spread sea lice to fish farms in the fall, but data showing that fish farms infect smolts when they swim out to the ocean, in the spring, is not conclusive. Anti-fish farm biologist Alexandra Morton emailed me that these studies are bogus, but did not explain why.
  2. In a 2015 interview, Morton conceded (starts 7:39 in podcast) that the fish farm’s delousing procedure “worked very well for seven years” prior to 2015. MHC is now beefing up their preventative measures with a 75-metre “freshwater well boat,” to give fresh water cleansing baths to their salmon twice a year.
  3.  Press release from Fisheries and Oceans Canada; According to Marine Harvest’s Integrated Annual Report 2015, from Norway, HSMI is listed third in the “Main causes of reduced survival” graph on page 68; Ironically: though HSMI is specifically mentioned in Norway’s Region West, this was also “the most profitable (fish farming) region in Norway in 2015” p 55

The Friends Of Cortes Island

The ECOreport interviews the President and Executive Director of the Friends of Cortes Island

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pmMax Thaysen described FOCI as a support group for local inhabitants confronting the environmental challenges in the Cortes Island area.  Helen Hall described the society’s role of both monitoring and protecting, as well as educating the  public. They are the President and Executive Director of the Friends of Cortes Island (FOCI), respectively.
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Four Decades Of Gillnetting In British Columbia

The ECOreport looks at commercial fishing with the help of one man’s experience, Four decades of gillnetting in British Columbia 

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMThere are more than more 40 names on the Cortes Island Museum’s list of fishermen from the 1970’s. Some were wives, who worked alongside their husbands. Others may have been deckhands. The names of 28 boats are given, though not how many were working in any given year. Now there are two.1 In this week’s radio program (podcast below), the owner of one of those 28 fish boats describes close to four decades of gillnetting in British Columbia.

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  1. Ken Block; Chris & Amy Kendel

The Developing World Leapfrogging Western Technology

The ECOreport interviews a well travelled consultant about reports of the Developing World Leapfrogging Western Technology

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMMuch of the planet does not possess the extensive financial, power, communications and automotive infrastructures that are commonplace in the West. This was a serious handicap throughout the 20th century. But as the planet transitions into new technologies,  there are reports of the developing world leapfrogging western technology to lead the way into a more sustainable future.

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