Category Archives: Sustainability

Tl’emtl’ems Left Squirrel Cove

By Roy L Hales

Its almost 550 km from Squirrel Cove, on Cortes Island, to Puyallup, Washington, by car, but centuries by canoe. In 1884 the Canadian Government joined in a conspiracy to destroy the canoe traffic that had once plied coastal waters from Alaska to California. First Nations people were restricted to their reserves and had had to obtain permission to leave. The reawakening started almost 30 years ago, in what has since become an annual event.  A different nation hosts the gathering every year and this summer the gathering is at Puyallup. The Klahoose canoe Tl’emtl’ems left Squirrel Cove at 10 AM this morning. 

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Where Are Germany’s Bears, Wolves And Eagles?

Originally Published in October, 2016, revised Feb 25, 2018.

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMOne of my wife’s fondest memories of Germany is the well maintained trails going through idyllic forests. She was visiting relatives during the late 1960’s and early 70’s. My impressions are both much later, and different. After my second trip to Germany, last year, I asked Andreas König, Head AG Wildlife Biology and Wildlife Management at the Technical University of Munich, where are Germany’s bears, wolves and eagles?

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How The Climate Is Changing Germany’s Lakes

Originally Published May 17, 2016

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMWe arrived at the Bavarian village of Iffeldorf the morning after the first snow, in late November, 2015. Dr. Uta Raeder, Co-Director of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) facility, greeted us in the parking lot. We huddled close, straining to catch her words before the wind, or traffic noises took, them away. She and her colleagues has been considering keeping us indoors. Instead they led us toward the boathouse, to see how they are monitoring how the climate is changing Germany’s lakes.

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Biocultural Ethics

By Bamidele Oni

The relationship between humans and their immediate environment is much more complex than we have always thought. This complexity is well defined in the relationship between biological and cultural diversity which has been found to be more direct, and that each influences the other to an extent. In a more explicit way, bio-cultural adaptability influences homogeneity, and which consequently results in habitat isolation for the reason of adaptive modification. The introduction of bicultural ethics is meant to change the narrative of ecological relationship from the predominantly mono-system status into the new possibility of recognizing the place of other pre-existing systems operating within an immediate environment and without necessarily changing the local setting that may exist.

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