Tag Archives: Toba Inlet

Catching English Fish & Chips

By Roy L Hales

Bernie Anderson and Leila Gmeiner had big expectations in the Spring of 1978. For the past two years, they had been homesteading in the wilderness of Toba Inlet, British Columbia. Then a friend offered them the use of his fishing boat. They had to make the monthly payments to the bank of course, but any profits beyond that were theirs to keep. Nobody could foresee they would be catching English Fish & Chips.

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Queen Of The Greenroom

By Roy L Hales

Her artistic roots go back to Vienna, while Russian troops still occupied part of the city. Years later, cast as the female lead in “As You Like It,” she found a much more fulfilling role than centre stage. She will be performing it again at this summer’s Lip Sync. Lella Gmeiner is the Queen of the Green Room.

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The Arborglyph That Survived

Originally Published on Cortes Radio

British Columbia is known for its totem poles. Examples of a less known artwork have surfaced in more recent years. Aborglyphs are carved into living trees. One was discovered a few years ago, two hundred kilometres north of Vancouver in the midst of a clearcut in Toba Inlet. The Klahoose Arborglyh has been moved to the band’s multipurpose building in Squirrel Cove, Cortes Island. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviewed Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the arborglyph that survived into modern times.

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The Toba Inlet Trail

Originally Published on Cortes Radio

Toba Inlet is a remote fjord roughly 180 kilometres north of Vancouver. It is geographically closer to Campbell River, though the trip is an hour and 45 minutes by water taxi. A recently discovered arborglyph, believed to be a trail marker, suggests this area was not so isolated in pre-colonial days. Deep Roots story producer Roy L Hales interviews Michelle Robinson and Ken Hanuse, from the Klahoose First Nation, and local historian Judith Williams about the Toba Inlet trail that most likely connected region to the rest of British Columbia.

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