Tag Archives: NOAA

Sea-level Rise Threatens European Communities

The ECOreport reposts another report of Climate impacts, Sea-level Rise Threatens European Communities.

Originally Published on NexisMedia, republished on Clean Technica

By Marlene Cimons

The kind of devastating flooding that occurs once every century along Europe’s northern coastline could become an annual event if greenhouse gas emissions continue to climb, according to a recent study published in the journal Earth’s Future.

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Changing Weather Patterns Trap Pollution Over Chinese Cities

The ECOreport reposts another report of Climate Change impacts,  Changing Weather PatternsTrap Pollution Over Chinese Cities

Originally published on Nexus Media, republished Clean Technica

By Marlene Cimons

While China has become a world leader in the fight against global warming, its severe winter air pollution has worsened, likely as a result of changing atmospheric circulation caused by climate change, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances.

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Extreme Weather Cost US Communities $53 Billion In 2016

The ECOrerport reposts analysis of the damages caused by climate change, extreme weather cost US Communities $53 billion in 2016

Originally Published on Center for American Progress

By Miranda Peterson and Cathleen Kelly

Extreme weather and climate disasters caused a staggering 297 deaths and $53.5 billion in economic damage in the United States in 2016. Of these disasters, 15 cost at least $1 billion and together triggered $49.1 billion in damage across 38 states. Center for American Progress analysis found that the economic toll of the 15 most destructive extreme weather events in 2016 was more than double the cost of similarly catastrophic events in 2015, which totaled $21.5 billion. Damage costs due to these severe weather, flood, wildfire, and drought events include insured and uninsured losses tied to damaged homes, businesses, buildings, cars, energy and transportation infrastructure, and agricultural assets. These damage costs, however, underestimate the total economic consequences of extreme weather: They do not take into account the destruction of natural assets—such as wetlands and parks—health care costs, and the economic impact tied to loss of life.

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Jet Stream + Climate Change = Cold Winters (Sometimes)

The ECOreport reposts news that the Jet Stream + Climate Change = Cold Winters (Sometimes)

Originally Published on the University of Sheffield News

Scientists have agreed for the first time that recent severe cold winter weather in the UK and US may have been influenced by climate change in the Arctic, according to a new study.

  • Scientists agree for first time that climate change may be intensifying the effects of the jet stream, causing extreme cold weather in the UK and US
  • Study could improve long-term forecasting of winter weather in most populous parts of the world
  • More accurate forecasting could help communities, businesses and economies prepare for severe weather and make life and cost-saving decisions

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Removing Four Dams From The Klamath River

The ECOreport reposts a story about river restoration fisheries, farming, and removing four dams from the Klamath River

Originally Published on Department of Interior

The U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Department of Commerce, PacificCorp, and the states of Oregon and California today signed an agreement that, following a process administered by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), is expected to remove four dams on the Klamath River by 2020, amounting to one of the largest river restoration efforts in the nation.

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Karuk Lawsuit Expands To Include Forest Service

The ECOreport reposts the story of why the Karuk Lawsuit Expands To Include Forest Service

Originally Published on the Fishsniffer & Daily KOS

By by Dan Bacher

The Karuk Tribe and four environmental groups today expanded their complaint challenging the Westside Post Fire logging plan to include the United States Forest Service and Klamath National Forest over allegations that they violated federal law protecting imperiled salmon and their watersheds.
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The Aliso Canyon Natural Gas Well Blowout

The ECOreport reposts a story of failures of natural gas infrastructure, the Aliso Canyon natural gas well blowout

Originally Published on UC Davis News

By Kat Kerlin

The Aliso Canyon natural gas well blowout, first reported on Oct. 23, 2015, released over 100,000 tons of the powerful greenhouse gas methane before the well was sealed on Feb. 11, according to the first study of the accident published today in the journal Science. The results confirm that Aliso Canyon is the largest methane leak in U.S. history.

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Energy Storage Is Jump Starting Renewables

The ECOreport reposts a story about how energy storage is jump starting renewables now & the future role of this technology

From The David Suzuki Foundation

By David Suzuki

Remote Australian communities often use diesel generators for power. They’re expensive to run and emit pollution and greenhouse gases. Even people who don’t rely entirely on generators use Australia’s power grid, which is mostly fuelled by polluting, climate-altering coal. Now, one company is showing that supplying Australia’s energy needn’t be expensive or polluting.
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Speed Is The Biggest Noise Factor Affecting Killer Whales

Speed Is The Biggest Noise Factor Affecting Killer Whales

Originally Published on UW Today

The speed of vessels operating near endangered killer whales in Washington is the most influential factor – more so than vessel size – in how much noise from the boats reaches the whales, according to a new study published today in the online journal PLOS ONE.

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Climate Change without Catastrophe

No one is certain what Climate Change will look like. The possibilities range from mass extinctions to Watts’ theory of Climate Change without Catastrophe

Originally Published on Oilprce.com

By James Stafford

We couldn’t pin down global warming, exactly, so now it’s re-labelled as climate change, which is an incredibly vague loaded term that no-one fully understands. The difficulty of pinning down this “wicked problem” has produced more uncertainty than ever and rendered the subject the purview of politics that has polarized the public and turned the issue into something reminiscent of the dark ages and conjuring up of weather-focused demons.

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