Tag Archives: GTAI

Renewables Supplied 44.1 Per Cent Of Germany’s Energy

By Roy L Hales

Germany added 2.3 GW  of new onshore wind capacity in the first half of 2017. Though it failed to meet the target last year, the Renewable Energy Act set annual target of installing 2.5 GW new solar capacity. Add in a warm autumn and the winter storms Xavier and Herwart, and it is easy to see how renewables supplied 44.1 per cent of Germany’s energy in October.

Continue reading Renewables Supplied 44.1 Per Cent Of Germany’s Energy

Energiewende’s Backbone

By Roy L Hales

A number of prominent companies come to mind when you mention Germany’s energy transition. Names like E.ON, Volkswagen, and Siemens are recognized around the world. But Energiewende’s real backbone is the nation’s 3.67 million small and medium-sized business enterprises.

Continue reading Energiewende’s Backbone

How The Climate Is Changing Germany’s Lakes

By Roy L Hales

We arrived at the Bavarian village of Iffeldorf the morning after the first snow, in late November, 2015. Dr. Uta Raeder, Co-Director of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) facility, greeted us in the parking lot. We huddled close, straining to catch her words before the wind, or traffic noises took, them away. She and her colleagues has been considering keeping us indoors. Instead they led us toward the boathouse, to see how they are monitoring how the climate is changing Germany’s lakes.

Continue reading How The Climate Is Changing Germany’s Lakes

Why We Need To Look At Hamburg Wasser

By Roy L Hales

This was to have been an article about the urban waste water and energy project for a new subdivision in Hamburg’s Jenfelder Au district. This as yet-to-be finished neighbourhood will use 30% less water than the surrounding area and have a completely self-sufficient energy supply. But this project is only one of the reasons why we need to look at Hamburg Wasser.

Continue reading Why We Need To Look At Hamburg Wasser

HafenCity is Designed To Be Flood Proof

By Roy L Hales

Sea levels have been rising 0.14 inches (3.5 millimeters) per year since the early 1990s. In the decades to come, many of the world’s coastal cities will be threatened. Hamburg’s new city core responded to this challenge with a relatively inexpensive solution, HafenCity is designed to be flood proof.

Continue reading HafenCity is Designed To Be Flood Proof