Tag Archives: Damien Gillis articles

Behind The Documentary Fractured Land

By Roy L Hales

The award-winning documentary “Fractured Land” follows the life of First Nations warrior and lawyer, Caleb Behn as he explores the impacts hydraulic fracturing is having on his community. It will soon be aired on the Knowledge Network. I had an opportunity to ask filmmaker Damien Gillis, What’s behind the documentary Fractured Land?

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Potentially Embarrassing Questions About BC’s Stumpage Rates

By Roy L Hales

During a recent interview,  film maker Damien Gillis said “there would be a great deal of outrage” if the public knew the degree to which we subsidize logging old growth forests. These subsidies come in the form of lower stumpage fees for the remote areas where most of our surviving ancient forests still persist.  Gillis also informed me this is a central issue in the United States’ softwood dispute with Canada. After the interview, I drew up a series of potentially embarrassing questions about BC’s stumpage rates.

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Inside One Of British Columbia’s Disappearing Old Growth Rainforests

By Roy L Hales

Most of us have seen historical photographs of the great forests that once stood in British Columbia. Though his family has worked in the forestry sector for a century, Damien Gillis’ first view of a forest like this came during a six-day-trek into the Incomappleux Valley. The award documentary film maker (Fractured Land, Oil in Eden) says, “it was like nothing I’ve seen before, just the way the ecosystem is really a cycle of life, death and rebirth right before your eyes.” Some of the trees he saw had been saplings around the time of the Roman Empire. The resulting documentary, Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux offers viewers a rare glimpse inside one of BC’s disappearing old growth rainforests.

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Continued Miscarriage of Government at Site C

The ECOreport summarizes new evidences of the continued miscarriage of government at Site C

By Roy L Hales

The proposed $12 billion Site C Dam has been controversial since it was originally proposed, more than 50 years ago. This project appears to violate Treaty 8, which granted use of the land that will be submerged to local First Nations. The B.C. Utilities Commission turned the project down twice, because B.C. Hydro could not prove there was a need for the power. Many believe that is why Premier Christy Clark’s Government has not allowed the commission to review the project during her tenure. The Canadian Government is now deeply involved in this project, which means local landowners, First Nations and environmentalists are attempting to defend the Peace River Valley against the very people who were elected to look after their interests. There are new evidences of the continued miscarriage of government at Site C.

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