Tag Archives: Cortes Island

Humpbacks Return To Cortes Island

By Roy L Hales

Humpback whales were passing through our area long before the first people arrived. Whaletown is one of Cortes Island’s principle villages.  Whaletown Road passes right through Squirrel Cove. There is a “Whaling Station Bay,” on Hornby and “Blubber Bay,” on Texada Island. Up until a few years ago, there have been no humpback whale sightings since 1871. This morning’s broadcast consists of a series of  interviews about the humpbacks return to Cortes Island.

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The Story Behind Phil’s Pick n Mix

By Roy L Hales

Phil Allen became a DJ back in the years that Cortes Community radio was a pirate station. He likes to find new music and share it with others. Phil jokes that his show is the one man and his dog show. It can feel very lonely, being in the DJ booth by himself speaking into a microphone. You don’t know if anyone is actually listening until someone comments about your show. So why does he do it? What is the Story Behind Phil’s Pick ’n Mix?

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Andy Vine’s Pilgrimage

By Roy L Hales

Andy Vine’s best known song is probably Woman of Labrador, which was released in 2005. His musical roots go back to the UK’s 1960s folk revival. CKTZ listeners know him as the host of the Folk Club, every Wednesday at 10:00 AM. I recently interviewed Andy about folk music, his trip to Ireland and much more.

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How Is FM Radio Still Relevant?

By Roy L Hales

In a world where even television is being eclipsed by the internet,  recent polls show that close to 80% of the American public still listens to FM radio at least once a day. More Americans listen to AM/FM radio each week than use Facebook. The statistics are similar for Canada. How is FM radio still relevant?

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How The Basil Creek Culvert Project Is Over The Top

By Roy L Hales

By the time you hear this, the Ministry of Transportation crew will have left Basil creek. As Cortes Streamkeeper Cecil Robinson observed, prior to this “if the fish came early and the rains were late, they just simply couldn’t get through the old culvert. They died right there.” Now more of them will swim upstream to their spawning grounds. Then he proceeded to describe how the “Basil Creek culvert project was over the top from the very beginning. Everything that needed to be done, is done: and then some more, always some more.”

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