Tag Archives: University of Washington

Poll Finds Washington Residents Support Tidal Energy

The ECOreport looks into new public opinion research from the Puget Sound, where a poll finds Washington Residents Support Tidal Energy

By Roy L Hales

Though there are a couple of operational projects along the United States eastern seaboard,1 tidal energy is still an infant technology. The Puget Sound is one of the most promising locations on the West Coast. In 2014 developers aborted a proposed project in Admiralty Inlet, between the Olympic Peninsula and Whidbey Island, because of ballooning costs. More recently,  a University of Washington poll finds Washington residents support tidal energy.

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  1. In the United States, Verdant Power first piloted an array of small turbines in the East River of New York as part of the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy (RITE) project and was the world’s first grid-connected tidal array demonstration. The Maine Tidal Energy Project, led by developer Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) featured one grid-connected turbine in Cobscook Bay, ME” – Stacia J. Dreyer et al, Changing Tides: Acceptability, support, and perceptions of tidal energy in the United States, ScienceDirect, Volume 29, July 2017, p 74

Scientists Condemn The Flawed Review Process For Lelu Island

The ECOreport looks at a joint letter in which more than 130 scientists condemn the flawed review process for Lelu Island 

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMThere are more than 130 of them, from Alaska, Russia, the West Coast as far south as California and east to the Atlantic coast. Their joint letter refers to “Misrepresentation,”  “lack of information” and “Disregard for science that was not funded by the proponent.” Scientists Condemn The Flawed Review Process For Lelu Island, at the mouth of British Columbia’s Skeena River, as “a symbol of what is wrong with environmental decision-making in Canada.”
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Tracking Pakistan’s Underground Water

The ECOreport reposts a story about about University of Washington engineers, using NASA data, tracking Pakistan’s Underground Water

Originally Published on UWToday

By Jennifer Langston

The vast farmlands of Pakistan — a country with an economy based on agriculture — rely on one of the largest continuous irrigation systems in the world. Farmers were once able to depend solely on rivers and man-made canals fed by glaciers and rain.
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The West Coast’s Herring Fishery

The ECOreport reposts a story describing complexities of the West Coast’s Herring Fishery

Originally Published on UWToday

By Michelle Ma

A wise investor plays the financial market by maintaining a variety of stocks. In the long run, the whole portfolio will be more stable because of the diversity of the investments it contains.

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Can We Protect Our Forests As The Climate Changes?

The ECOreport interviews an “expert” who is asking  can we protect our forests as the climate changes?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1Over the past 30 years, temperatures have risen around 1.5 degrees fahernheit on the slopes of Colorado’s La Plata Mountains. Though it is difficult to speak authoritaivley, University of Washington’s graduate student Leander Anderegg believes the forests will probably change during the net generation. They will definietly change during ourlifetime. His key question is, can we protect our forests as the climate changes?

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Speed Is The Biggest Noise Factor Affecting Killer Whales

Speed Is The Biggest Noise Factor Affecting Killer Whales

Originally Published on UW Today

The speed of vessels operating near endangered killer whales in Washington is the most influential factor – more so than vessel size – in how much noise from the boats reaches the whales, according to a new study published today in the online journal PLOS ONE.

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NASA Is Studying The Olympic Peninsula’s Wet Weather

They brought weather radars, weather balloons, & NASA’s DC-8 flying laboratory. From Nov 10 – Dec 21, 2015. NASA is studying the Olympic Peninsula’s wet weather

Press Release from NASA

From Nov. 10 through Dec. 21, NASA and university scientists are taking to the field to study wet winter weather near Seattle, Washington. With weather radars, weather balloons, specialized ground instruments, and NASA’s DC-8 flying laboratory, the science team will be verifying rain and snowfall observations made by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission.

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Cellulosic Ethanol In The Pacific Northwest

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMMost people think of corn when they hear the word ethanol, but a consortium of 10 education and industry partners, including the University of Washington, hope to change that. They are behind the push to produce cellulosic ethanol in the Pacific Northwest .

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Warmer Ocean May Be Releasing Frozen Methane

A University of Washington Study Suggests 1/3 of a mile below the surface, the Warmer Ocean May Be Releasing Frozen Methane into the atmosphere as a greenhouse gas.

Originally Published on UW Today

Warming ocean temperatures a third of a mile below the surface, in a dark ocean in areas with little marine life, might attract scant attention. But this is precisely the depth where frozen pockets of methane ‘ice’ transition from a dormant solid to a powerful greenhouse gas.

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Clues From the Arctic’s 4th-Lowest Sea-Ice

Scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego & the University of Washington’s Applied Physics Lab on Clues From the Arctic’s 4th-Lowest Sea-Ice

From Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego Communications Office

By Robert Monroe 

As the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) announced the fourth lowest Arctic sea-ice minimum on record Sept. 15, an oceanographic team aboard the National Science Foundation’s R/V Sikuliaq is using unique instruments to explore the undersea secrets of ice-melt in the Beaufort Sea.

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