Tag Archives: Torrance Coste

What Do You Think Site C Is Really About?

By Roy L Hales

The last of the B.C. Utility Commission’s Community Input Sessions was at the Victoria, on October 11, 2017. Having already covered this story dozens of times, I was not that interested in listening to a repetition of the same old arguments. So I asked Torrance Coste of the Wilderness Committee, “What do you think Site C is really about?”

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Potentially Embarrassing Questions About BC’s Stumpage Rates

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pm1During a recent interview,  film maker Damien Gillis said “there would be a great deal of outrage” if the public knew the degree to which we subsidize logging old growth forests. These subsidies come in the form of lower stumpage fees for the remote areas where most of our surviving ancient forests still persist.  Gillis also informed me this is a central issue in the United States’ softwood dispute with Canada. After the interview, I drew up a series of potentially embarrassing questions about BC’s stumpage rates.

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Clearcutting The Walbran’s Thousand-Year-Old Trees

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMIt has been a year since the Wilderness Committee drew our attention to the planned logging of old growth trees in the central Walbran Valley. So far, the controversial heli-block 4424 has remained untouched. Since last November, Teal Jones has been logging 6 or 7 cutblocks in the more easily accessible areas south of the river.  They are already clearcutting the Walbran’s thousand-year-old trees.

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Do The Pacific Coast’s Climate Leaders Mean Business?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1On June 1, 2016, the Governors of Washington, Oregon and California joined British Columbia’s Environment Minister and representatives from six West Coast cities, in the Borgia Room of San Francisco’s Westin St. Francis Hotel, to sign what history may show was a key milestone in the struggle to mount a concerted defence against the ravages of global temperature rise. The 2016 Pacific Coast Climate Leadership Action Plan has a strong emphasis on issues like ocean acidification; the integration of clean energy into the power grid; “support for efforts by the insurance industry and regulatory system to highlight the economic costs of climate change; and so-called “super pollutants” (also known as short-lived climate pollutants).” This sounds good, but do the Pacific Coast’s “Climate Leaders” mean business?

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Why The Walbran Is Important

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1British Columbia’s Ministry of Forests said the first cutback the in the Walbran Valley is only 3.2 hectares large. It is to be  heli-logged,  not clearcut. The province is protecting over 30,300 hectares in old growth management areas in the South Island Natural Resource District. The map on the top of this page shows what they did not say, why the Walbran is important.

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BC’s Supreme Court Rules The Ministry Of Forests Does Not Have A Duty To Protect Forests

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1ForestEthics and the Wilderness Committee sued BC’s Minister of Forests for failing to protect the Douglas fir, which once occupied approximately 2,555 square kilometers of BC. This species has shrunk to only about 20 square kilometers and roughly 2.75 kilometers of Old Growth trees. does not have a “legal duty, express or implied” to do his job.  BC’s Supreme Court Rules that the Ministry of Forests does not have a duty to Protect Forests.
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Impending Hearings on BC’s Kinder Morgan Pipeline

By Roy L Hales

Screen shot 2014-03-18 at 3.43.47 PMThe next act in what some are already calling a struggle to Save the Salish Sea began on December 16, 2013, when Kinder Morgan filed an application to build and extend the 1,150-mile-long Trans Mountain pipeline that brings oil from Alberta to BC’s Lower Mainland. The impending hearings on BC’s Kinder Morgan Pipeline project could shape the province’s environmental prospects for decades.
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A MUST SEE Climate Change video: “Save the Salish Sea”

By Roy L Hales

Screen shot 2014-03-18 at 3.43.47 PMWhile most of us are attempting to do away with fossil fuels, British Columbia is trying to ramp up production. Some plan to make this most beautiful of Canadian provinces a major exporter of American coal and tar sands bitumen. One of the most promising natural gas fields in the world is in the north eastern corner of our province. Some aspects of this have been well publicized in the Canadian media, as every level of government – from our Prime Minister, to the Premier of BC, to individual municipalities – are involved. The Wilderness Committee have provided the best overview, a must-see Climate Change video: “Save the Salish Sea.”

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