Tag Archives: GTAI press junket

How The Climate Is Changing Germany’s Lakes

The ECOreport went to Bavaria, to see how the climate is changing Germany’s lakes

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMWe arrived at the Bavarian village of Iffeldorf the morning after the first snow, in late November, 2015. Dr. Uta Raeder, Co-Director of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) facility, greeted us in the parking lot. We huddled close, straining to catch her words before the wind, or traffic noises took, them away. She and her colleagues has been considering keeping us indoors. Instead they led us toward the boathouse, to see how they are monitoring how the climate is changing Germany’s lakes.

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The World’s Largest Waste-To-Energy System

The ECOreport reposts the World’s largest waste-to-energy system, which also slashes water use by 80%  

Originally Published on Environmental Business International, Inc

By Jim Hight

A new community in Hamburg, Germany, will use a vacuum sewer system to create the largest closed-loop waste-to-energy and water recycling system in the world.

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Where are Germany’s Bears, Wolves and Eagles?

The ECOreport looks at the wildlife in one of Europe’s economic powerhouses and asks, where are Germany’s bears, wolves and eagles?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMOne of my wife’s fondest memories of Germany is the well maintained trails going through idyllic forests. She was visiting relatives during the late 1960’s and early 70’s. My impressions are both much later, and different. After my second trip to Germany, last year, I asked Andreas König, Head AG Wildlife Biology and Wildlife Management at the Technical University of Munich, where are Germany’s bears, wolves and eagles?

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Why We Need To Look At Hamburg Wasser

The ECOreport explains why we need to look at Hamburg Wasser

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1This was to have been an article about the urban waste water and energy project for a new subdivision in Hamburg’s Jenfelder Au district. This as yet-to-be finished neighbourhood will use 30% less water than the surrounding area and have a completely self-sufficient energy supply. But this project is only one of the reasons why we need to look at Hamburg Wasser.

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Germany’s Innovations In Water Infrastructure

Originally Published on Water Canada

By Todd Latham,

Between Nov. 22-28, 2015 I was invited to join a group of media representatives on a seven-day tour to see Germany’s innovations in water infrastructure. We packed in more site visit and presentations than I have space to describe in this blog, so I will offer a snapshot of the water-focused highlights of Munich, Hamburg, and Berlin, with more to come. Welcome to Germany!

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HafenCity is Designed To Be Flood Proof

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMSea levels have been rising 0.14 inches (3.5 millimeters) per year since the early 1990s. In the decades to come, many of the world’s coastal cities will be threatened. Hamburg’s new city core responded to this challenge with a relatively inexpensive solution, HafenCity is designed to be flood proof.

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Questioning Thomas Grigoleit About Energiewende

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMI finally met Thomas Grigoleit last week. The Director of Energy and Environmental Technology for Germany’s economic development agency (Germany Trade and Invest) peddled up to the restaurant where we were waiting. He had left the office for the day and, folding his suit into a rucksack, set off on his bicycle to meet the North American journalists. This was probably going to be my best opportunity for questioning Thomas Grigoleit about Energiewende.

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How Dams Can Protect Us From Climate Change

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMBavaria’s Sylvensteinspeicher (Sylvenstein Dam) has two power plants whose combined electrical capacity is 7 MW (26 GWh a year). Andreas Bauer, of the Regional state office for water management in Weilheim, says that while they are happy to produce electricity, this is a byproduct. The earthen embankment dam’s main purpose is to  withstand floods, and retain enough water to keep servicing the surrounding area during droughts. This facility has withstood a number of extreme weather events during its’ 56 year history. The Sylvensteinspeicher, operated by the Regional state office for water management in Weilheim as part of the Bavarian State Ministry of the Environment and Consumer Protection, is an example of how dams can protect us from Climate Change.
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While Germany Explores Energy Storage Technologies at Breakneck Speeds, The US Isn’t Far Behind

Published on Renewable Energy World

Philip Hiersemenzel, spokesman for Younicos, stated that Germany could be using 60 percent renewables if the right storage tech were in place. Startling as this announcement seems, the US is not as far behind as people think.

By Roy Hales, Contributor

The U.S. is surging ahead in terms of adopting battery storage. In 2013-2014, U.S. companies installed, or were in the process of installing more than 300 MW of energy storage capacity. The largest is Southern California Edison’s Tehachapi Energy Storage Project. It is a 8-MW system capable of supplying 32 megawatt-hours of electricity to the grid.

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A longer version of this story was in the November/December 204 Renewable Energy World Magazine

Germany’s Wind industry is not like Southern California’s

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1The sheer number of wind turbines in Germany is overwhelming! When the clouds open, they are often visible from the windows of a jet entering the country. Though they are primarily a rural phenomenon, there are about 60 turbines in the city of Hamburg. Some of the behemoths in Mecklenbourg-Verpommern have a capacity of 7.5 MW,  more than twice the 3 MW found in North America. Yet, speaking as one of a group of journalists touring renewable installations recently, unless you are standing directly underneath a turbine was difficult to pick out the “whoosh” of their whirling blades from other ambient sounds. Germany’s wind industry is an integral part of the nation’s energy revolution, which at least 56% of the respondents to a poll taken in 2013 said was “the right thing to do.” Only 10% were actually opposed. Germany’s Wind industry is not like Southern California’s.

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