Tag Archives: Environment Minister Mary Polak

Christy Clark’s Liberals Attack Vancouver’s Attempt To Limit Emissions

By Roy L Hales

The future of Vancouver’s new Green Building Rezoning Policy is already uncertain. As of this morning, there is an emissions cap on all new construction and buildings applying for rezoning. There are several ways developers “can meet the energy efficiency and emissions targets (50 per cent decrease in GHGs).” They can use “better insulation, thicker windows, and better design, as well as opting for renewable energy.” However the largest cause of the city’s emissions is natural gas and so  Premier Christy Clark’s Liberals attack Vancouver’s attempt to limit emissions.

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Pembina’s Clean Energy & Climate Debate Illustrated Very “Alternate” Realities

By Roy L Hales

With the election approaching, the Pembina Institute brought together prominent candidates from B.C.’s three major political parties to debate the province’s road to a more planet friendly future. Despite the  underlying tension, everyone was polite. There was laughter. Yet Pembina’s clean energy & climate debate illustrated very “alternate” realities.

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What BC’s Fossil Fuel Companies Get For their Campaign Contributions

By Roy L Hales

Fossil fuel companies pumped more than $5.1 million into British Columbia’s elections between 2008 and 2015. 92% of that money was given to the BC Liberal party, which was in office through-out that period. The remainder went to the leading opposition party, the New Democratic Party (NDP). A new report from the Centre for Policy Alternatives, MAPPING THE POLITICAL INFLUENCE examines the funds and lobbying data to get answers. So what do BC’s Fossil Fuel Companies Get For their Campaign Contributions?

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BC Reacts To The NEB’s Pipeline Recommendation

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMAs everyone expected, the National Energy Board (NEB) has recommended that the Canadian Government approve Kinder Morgan’s proposed Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion through the most populated area of British Columbia. The NEB believes the likelihood of a major oil spill “very low,” but “the potential significance” of such a spill “very high.” Kinder Morgan would be required to post calculations of the emissions from all industrial activities and those created during construction of the 1150 km (715 miles) pipeline. If the Trudeau Government agrees and the project goes forward, the number of tankers carrying diluted bitumen out of the Greater Vancouver area could increase from 1 or 2 a week to 10. These are some of the ways BC reacts to the NEB’s pipeline recommendation.
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BC’s Five Conditions Must Be Met

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMRumour has it British Columbia may be on the verge of coming to an agreement with Alberta that could overcome one of the biggest hurdles confronting the Site C Dam project. Though the province is not expected to need the controversial dam’s electricity until about 2029, if ever, there are conditions under which Alberta might be willing to purchase it. Premier Rachel Notley told the Globe and Mail this isn’t a simple quid per quo deal, but also made it clear the deal must include a pipeline. In response, British Columbia’s Minister of Environment  once again reaffirmed the position her government adopted in 2012. BC’s five conditions must be met before the government will support a pipeline project.

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BC Wants Input On A “World-Leading” Provincial Spills Regime

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMBefore May 20, the National Energy Board is expected to recommend that Kinder Morgan’s proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion be approved. If the Government of Canada agrees, we could see a seven-fold increase of tankers carrying diluted bitumen through the most populated area of British Columbia. In preparation for this, BC wants input on a “world-leading” provincial spills regime.
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Lelu Island Could Become Canada’s Largest Carbon Polluter

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMOne of the smartest things Premier Christy Clark’s government has done was ask Matt Horne, of the Pembina Institute, to join BC’s Climate Leadership Team last year. The credibility they gained from that single act opened the door to new possibilities. Unfortunately that door appears to have shut . Premier Clark chose to ignore the suggestions made by her Climate Leadership Team. Yesterday  Horne has released a statement that the proposed LNG facility on Lelu Island could become Canada’s largest carbon polluter.

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Does BC Still Have A Cap On LNG Emissions?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1Years before Premier Christy Clark dreampt of the billion dollar opportunity to frack British Columbia, the province set a cap on LNG emissions. As of Jaunary 1, facilities can produce higher emissions than was previously allowed “by purchasing offsets or buying funded units.” 1 Does BC still have a cap on LNG emissions?

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Has Canada Come Back?

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMThe Canadian delegation in Paris is more than 250 strong. In addition to the Prime Minister, five Premiers, representatives from the provinces and Territories whose Premiers did not attend, representatives from all the opposition parties, twenty negotiators, support staff, personal from the Canadian embassy in Paris, mayors, business people, youth leaders,  environmentalists and reporters. There has never been a Canadian delegation this large at any previous COP and the sheer size of this endeavour shows that  Canada is taking COP 21 seriously. After a decade of withdrawal from the fight against Climate Change, has Canada come back?

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Some Questions About BC’s Carbon Tax

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMBritish Columbia’s carbon tax has been extolled by authorities around the World. When it was first introduced, in 2008, the carbon tax rate was to increased by $5-per-tonne each year. The biggest criticism I’ve heard is that the province should not have capped it at $30-per-tonne in 2013. So, after reading that the International Monetary Fund invited Environment Minister Mary Polak to speak at the 2015 Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund in Peru, I asked the Ministry some questions about BC’s Carbon Tax.

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