Tag Archives: Damien Gillis articles

NDP’s Economic Record FAR Better Than BC Liberals

The ECOreport reposts an OP=ED, the NDP’s Economic Record FAR Better Than BC Liberals

Originally Published on the Common Sense Canadian

By Damien Gillis

Many people are ready for a change in Victoria. Christy Clark is one of the least popular candidates for premier in BC history and, after 16 years of scandal-filled rule, her Liberal Party has tried British Columbians’ patience to the extreme. Yet every day on social media, I run across a familiar refrain: “Better than going back to the NDP’s lost decade.” Clearly, that narrative is so deeply embedded that it threatens to keep the NDP out of government yet again.
Continue reading NDP’s Economic Record FAR Better Than BC Liberals

Behind The Documentary Fractured Land

The ECOreport interviews filmmaker Damien Gillis to look behind the documentary Fracture Land

By Roy L Hales

The award-winning documentary “Fractured Land” follows the life of First Nations warrior and lawyer, Caleb Behn as he explores the impacts hydraulic fracturing is having on his community. It will soon be aired on the Knowledge Network. I had an opportunity to ask filmmaker Damien Gillis, What’s behind the documentary Fractured Land?

Continue reading Behind The Documentary Fractured Land

Potentially Embarrassing Questions About BC’s Stumpage Rates

The ECOreport looks into the issues behind some potentially embarrassing questions about BC’s stumpage rates

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pm1During a recent interview,  film maker Damien Gillis said “there would be a great deal of outrage” if the public knew the degree to which we subsidize logging old growth forests. These subsidies come in the form of lower stumpage fees for the remote areas where most of our surviving ancient forests still persist.  Gillis also informed me this is a central issue in the United States’ softwood dispute with Canada. After the interview, I drew up a series of potentially embarrassing questions about BC’s stumpage rates.

Continue reading Potentially Embarrassing Questions About BC’s Stumpage Rates

Inside One Of British Columbia’s Disappearing Old Growth Rainforests

The ECOreport reviews the documentary film Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux, which offers viewers a rare glimpse inside one of British Columbia’s disappearing old growth rainforests.

By Roy L Hales

screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3-43-47-pmMost of us have seen historical photographs of the great forests that once stood in British Columbia. Though his family has worked in the forestry sector for a century, Damien Gillis’ first view of a forest like this came during a six-day-trek into the Incomappleux Valley. The award documentary film maker (Fractured Land, Oil in Eden) says, “it was like nothing I’ve seen before, just the way the ecosystem is really a cycle of life, death and rebirth right before your eyes.” Some of the trees he saw had been saplings around the time of the Roman Empire. The resulting documentary, Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux offers viewers a rare glimpse inside one of BC’s disappearing old growth rainforests.

Continue reading Inside One Of British Columbia’s Disappearing Old Growth Rainforests

Entering the Incomappleux

The ECOreport reposts Damien Gillis’ description of his documentary film about entering the Incomappleux Valley

Originally Published on Common Sense Canadian

By Damien Gillis

How do we value wilderness? What metrics should we apply to an 1,800-year-old tree, or the tiny lichens that make their home on it? What numbers do we input into our calculator – ecosystem services rendered, tonnes of carbon sequestered, cubic metres of merchantable timber, jobs created? These are the questions that came to mind while filming my latest documentary, “Primeval: Enter the Incomappleux”, deep in the heart of the Selkirk Mountains in BC’s Kootenay region.

Continue reading Entering the Incomappleux

Who Really Killed BC Hydro?

The ECOreport reposts an OP-ED by one of British Columbia’s most thought provoking former provincial cabinet ministers: Who Really Killed BC Hydro?

Originally Published on the Common Sense Canadian

By Rafe Mair

This is the story of the death of our province’s once greatest institution, BC Hydro. Though the public power utility began its life under Socred Premier WAC Bennett in 1961, the story of its demise starts circa 2001, under the newly-minted Liberal administration of Gordon Campbell.

Continue reading Who Really Killed BC Hydro?

Continued Miscarriage of Government at Site C

The ECOreport summarizes new evidences of the continued miscarriage of government at Site C

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMThe proposed $12 billion Site C Dam has been controversial since it was originally proposed, more than 50 years ago. This project appears to violate Treaty 8, which granted use of the land that will be submerged to local First Nations. The B.C. Utilities Commission turned the project down twice, because B.C. Hydro could not prove there was a need for the power. Many believe that is why Premier Christy Clark’s Government has not allowed the commission to review the project during her tenure. The Canadian Government is now deeply involved in this project, which means local landowners, First Nations and environmentalists are attempting to defend the Peace River Valley against the very people who were elected to look after their interests. There are new evidences of the continued miscarriage of government at Site C.

Continue reading Continued Miscarriage of Government at Site C

Is BC Hydro Already Breaking Promises at Site C?

The ECOreport reposts a story of the Peace River, there are reports of lacking permits and destroyed eagles nests. Is BC Hydro Already Breaking Promises at Site C?

Originally Published on the Common Sense Canadian

By Damien Gillis

BC Hydro’s clearcut logging this past weekend at the location of the proposed Site C Dam appears to have broken a promise about care for active eagles’ nests and may have lacked federal permits, critics charge.

Continue reading Is BC Hydro Already Breaking Promises at Site C?

Lax Kw’alaams Occupy Lelu Island

Three months after rejecting Petrona’s $1.6 billion offer for their consent to Pacific Northwest LNG, Lax Kw’alaams Occupy Lelu Island to ensure the project di-oes not go forward.

Originally Published on the Common Sense Canadian

By Damien Gillis

The battle over Malaysian energy giant Petronas’ controversial LNG terminal in the Skeena River Estuary is intensifying, as local Lax Kw’alaams First Nation members are setting up camp on Lelu Island, near Prince Rupert – the site of the proposed project.

Continue reading Lax Kw’alaams Occupy Lelu Island

BC Hydro Cutting Down 28 Eagle Nests

Treaty 8 First Nations are seeking an injunction to stop the latest development in the proposed Site C Dam project. BC Hydro Cutting Down 28 Eagle Nests.

Originally Published on the Common Sense Canadian

By Damien Gillis

Treaty 8 First Nations are seeking an injunction as BC Hydro rushes to cut down a number of Bald Eagles’ nests along the Peace River, starting next month, for Site C Dam.

Continue reading BC Hydro Cutting Down 28 Eagle Nests