Tag Archives: Chancellor Angela Merkel

Trump Wants A New Climate Deal

The ECOreport looks into the United States withdrawal from COP 21, Trump wants a new climate deal

By Roy L Hales

Though often been portrayed as a climate change denier, the President made no reference to climate when he explained the reasons for America’s withdrawal from the agreement reached at Paris in 2015. Rather, it seems Donald Trump wants a new climate deal.
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Is This The End Of Coal In Europe?

The ECOreport reposts an OP-ED about the European pledges to stop investing in coal after 2020, Is This The End Of Coal In Europe?

Originally Published on Greenpeace Energydesk

By Zachary Davies Boren

Last week EU energy industry group Eurelectric released what seems on the surface to be a seismic announcement. With just a few exceptions, Europe’s utilities pledged that they would stop investing in new coal plants after 2020. The Guardian declared it ‘the end of coal’ in Europe, and the story even found its way into the US press. But it’s more complicated than that.

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Germany’s G-20 Presidency May Prevent Backsliding on Climate Actions

The ECOreport reposts an OP-ED about Germany’s G-20 Presidency May Prevent Backsliding on Climate Actions

Originally published on Center for American Progress

By Gwynne Taraska, Pete Ogden, Nancy Alexander, and Howard Marano

This column previews a forthcoming report from the Center for American Progress and Heinrich-Böll-Stiftung North America.

To date, 17 countries of the G-20—which account for 67 percent of global greenhouse gas pollution—have officially joined the Paris Agreement, bringing it into effect far sooner than anyone expected. If these countries follow through with their commitments to reduce emissions, it will represent unprecedented progress in the global effort to curb climate change.

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The Push for A 1.5 Degree Ceiling

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PMThe Guardian‘s headlines say it all. “Biggest Polluters Back Tougher Warming Target.” As EU spokeswoman Carole Dieschebourg said,  “We have a difficult week ahead. All the major issues are unresolved.” The United States, China and Canada have joined the push for a 1.5 degree ceiling in Paris.

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Energiewende Will Succeed

The ECOreport Part Three of the Five Most Attractive Nations for Renewable Investments, Energiewende Will Succeed

Bye Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1American critics of Energiewende regularly announce its approaching  demise.  A hypocritical article in the Wallstreet Journal announced that Germany will spend €1 trillion on its’ renewable energy experiment by 2040, without mentioning that a large portion of that money was for electric grid upgrades that would be needed anyway. Nor did the author disclose the fact an even larger sum (€90 billion a year) would have gone to fossil fuels. Similarly, Forbes mocked Germany’s slight rise in CO2 levels, without mentioning they are already 23% lower than the 1990 benchmark set by the Kyoto Accord. (The author’s country, the US, is still 5% above that target.) Their carping does not explain how Germany became Europe’s powerhouse and the fourth largest economy in the World. Nor does it do justice to the nation the  Renewable Energy Country Attractiveness Index (RECAI) ranks #3 for renewable investments. Energiewende will succeed because it is embraced by the German people.

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Germany’s Wind industry is not like Southern California’s

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1The sheer number of wind turbines in Germany is overwhelming! When the clouds open, they are often visible from the windows of a jet entering the country. Though they are primarily a rural phenomenon, there are about 60 turbines in the city of Hamburg. Some of the behemoths in Mecklenbourg-Verpommern have a capacity of 7.5 MW,  more than twice the 3 MW found in North America. Yet, speaking as one of a group of journalists touring renewable installations recently, unless you are standing directly underneath a turbine was difficult to pick out the “whoosh” of their whirling blades from other ambient sounds. Germany’s wind industry is an integral part of the nation’s energy revolution, which at least 56% of the respondents to a poll taken in 2013 said was “the right thing to do.” Only 10% were actually opposed. Germany’s Wind industry is not like Southern California’s.

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Tracing the story of Germany’s Offshore Wind Farms

By Roy L Hales

Screen-shot-2014-03-18-at-3.43.47-PM1Germany was not the first European nation to install offshore wind farms. There were plants in Denmark and England years before the first turbine was erected a mere 500 meters off the quay wall of the Rostock international port in 2005.  Tracing the story of Germany’s offshore wind farms, we repeatedly found references to the independent project planning company WIND-projekt GmbH, whose portfolio includes everything from on and offshore-wind turbines to energy storage.

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