New Threat To Desolation Sound

By Roy L Hales

In the summer of 2016, a subsidiary of one of the world’s leading aggregate companies announced it was about to commence exploratory surface drilling in the Lloyd Creek Area of Desolation Sound. This is in close proximity to the region’s foremost kayak and boating area and, consequently, brings a substantial income to local businesses. Had the venture gone forward, one of the regions few remaining old growth forests would have been cut down, an important fish bearing creek would have been devastated and a number of important indigenous sites would have been threatened. Lehigh Hanson Materials abandoned its application, but local author Judith Williams talks about a new threat to Desolation Sound.

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Noba’s Lawyer Filed His Response

By Roy L Hales

From the beginning, the legal petition filed against Strathcona Regional Director Noba Anderson appeared to be slipshod. Numerous factual errors were reported. The amounts of the alleged bribes are trivial, mostly ranging between $20 and $100. The suggestion that they are anything other than donations to a fire relief fund seems dubious, especially as none of the petition’s allegations are substantiated. This impression was materially strengthened when Noba’s lawyer filed his response on Thursday

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A Mature Forest Ecosystem

Originally published on the Cortes Tideline (2014)

By Bruce Ellingsen

I believe that most of us now realize that a mature forest ecosystem is a complex community of interconnected, interdependent organisms demonstrably capable of developing, expanding and sustaining itself. To appreciate this, we only have to consider the forests that existed in much of North America and, more specifically, on our Pacific Coast, when we Europeans arrived. 

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Quality Forestry Always Takes Time

Originally published on A Conversation On BC Forests (2011).

By David Shipway

As a woodworker on the drier southern BC coast with a very small woodlot, and some working familiarity with the timber journey – from seed to old tree and from sawn lumber to sailboat, it seems
obvious to me that there’s still a tug of war between two polarized goals in forestry. One strives for Quantity, the other strives for Quality. It’s a simplification I know, but then we could also call it
Ishmael’s battle between Takers and Leavers, and ask who is winning. Nearly always in our modern addiction to economic growth, gross volume wins over real value. But the short-term quest for higher quantity has already severely compromised long term timber quality in many coastal watersheds. Does this have to be the eternal dilemma in our transient relationship with wild forests, trees and wood? Or is this really a false dichotomy built on ignorant assumptions? Is there a better middle path, a more gracious future in a truly sustainable forestry?

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